Are you testing enough? Neckties and Tactics

wrong ties

In the past, we preached, based on testing, that one longer donation page resulted in more completed gifts than several pages that each asked for pieces of the donation. No longer, it seems.

Test results release at last week’s New York Nonprofit Conference, sponsored by the Direct Marketing Association’s Nonprofit Federation, indicated that users have changed, and multi-page donation processes are worth testing again.

More testing ideas:

Test the color of the “Donate Now” button. Yes, the marketing/communications people want it to blend in with your home page header. YOU want it to stand out. While red may stand out, a member of the audience pointed out that 10% of men, and 3% of women, are red-blue colorblind.

How much are you cultivating your new email subscribers before determining if they are returning enough in gifts to cover their cost of acquisition? Maybe not long enough. Most of us apply a direct mail thought process to this equation, which is based on the typical single-use permission of a rented name. When you get an email subscriber, you have permission to contact them until they decide otherwise.  Going slow — as many as eight or ten emails before a blatant fundraising appeal — might yield better results.

Are you testing gift arrays, on both your mail reply forms and web forms? (Warning: the best array may be different for each). The National Park Foundation found they were getting many $25 gifts, even though their gift array started at $35 and went up from there. So they tested a $25 amount, and found a 17% lift in response rate, with only a 4% drop in average gift.

Are you talking to event participants about the event when you contact them for further follow-up, or are they getting the same email everyone else is?

Are you testing re-marketing? There are ad networks that can show your ads on other websites that are visited by people who’ve come to your site but not made a gift. Google runs one of them. One nonprofit found that 18% of the 1,500 site visitors they re-marketed ultimately made a gift. (Yes, many of them would have someday made a gift anyway.)

Personalized copy on the outer envelope seems to get it opened more. “Donor Since 20xx” is one line (printed right under the donor’s name) that seems to work.

Warning: I suspect much of testing results include a certain “Hawthorne Effect” – the new test works because it’s new, not because it’s universally better.  Results increase at first, then decline. Remember the Eagles’ hit There’s a New Kid in Town” or those too-wide and too-skinny neckties in your closet, waiting for the fashion pendulum to swing back the other way.

What tests have you run lately? How have they worked?

 

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